Natural History Pubs

Natural History Pub Series

Bring your curiosity and appetite for food and drink to our Natural History Pub programs held at McMenamins Old St. Francis School in downtown Bend. Enjoy hearing about topics such as animal behavior, range restoration or geologic activity from the scientists involved in these projects. The series runs from September to May. This is a FREE event, but seating is limited and an RSVP is required. Registration for each Natural History Pub opens one month prior to the event.

Tuesday, December 11

Native Fish
Native fish of Oregon’s High Desert, such as the Warner sucker, Foskett speckled dace and Hutton tui chub, thrive in healthy streams, lakes and springs. Some species exist only in certain places, such as the Borax Lake chub, which are only found in one 10-acre lake. However, these species have faced numerous threats to their habitats. Join us to hear Alan Mauer, fish and wildlife biologist with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, discuss the importance of these fish and some of the conservation actions that will aid in protecting their future.

7:00 pm, doors open at 5:30 pm
Food and beverage sales in the Rimrock Cafe begins at 5:30 pm. Seating is limited and RSVP is required.

PLEASE NOTE that this edition of the Natural History Pub takes place at the High Desert Museum.

Tuesday, January 8
Registration will open on December 12.

The Spread of Juniper
A long-term, ongoing research study in Central Oregon has provided important information about water availability in landscapes that are dominated by western juniper. Join Dr. Carlos Ochoa, assistant professor of watershed-riparian systems at Oregon State University, for a discussion of this tree, its impacts and potential solutions.

7:00 pm, doors open at 5:30 pm
Food and beverage sales in Father Luke’s Room help support this popular lecture series.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School
700 NW Bond St., Bend

Tuesday, February 12
Registration will begin January 9.

The Human Dimensions of Climate Change
Climate change research indicates that a small window of time exists to mitigate the most severe outcomes of climate change. This talk will discuss some of the dynamics of climate science that are most pressing and the human impacts of climate change, including sea level rise, flooding and disaster policy readiness for high risk events. Dr. Elizabeth Marino, assistant professor of anthropology at OSU-Cascades, will lend insight into how change can come from unlikely corners, as well as how cross-cultural communication and consensus building can help us to build resilience. Join us to also hear about a new laboratory at OSU-Cascades.

7:00 pm, doors open at 5:30 pm
Food and beverage sales in Father Luke’s Room help support this popular lecture series.

McMenamins Old St. Francis School
700 NW Bond St., Bend

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